Tag Archives: sharing

#saskedchat Summer Blogging Challenge

cropped-img_0180.jpg

Week 2 of the #saskedchat Summer Blogging Challenge

Our topic this week is Supporting. Tribe, a post by Jana Scott Lindsay, has me pondering how do we support ourselves and, just as importantly, be part of a support system for others. Jana starts her post off with a great quote from Seth Godin – go check it out. I’ll wait.

Pretty great quote isn’t it? Great post too!

Seth Godin constantly reminds me that I don’t have to write a short story to get a point across. In fact, sometimes less is more. In his post today, The Top of The Pile  he asks

We need an empathy of attention. Attention is something that can’t be refunded or recalled. Once it’s gone, it’s gone.

So, what have you done to earn it?

In his latest book What to do When It’s Your Turn (and it’s always your turn) Godin reminds us that

Now, more than ever, more of us have freedom to care,

the freedom to connect,

the freedom to choose

the freedom to initiate

the freedom to do what matters,

If we choose.

It’s that choice part that I need to pay attention to and remind myself about. As Jana discusses in her post – you read it right? – being conscious of others is a choice, being part of a tribe is a choice, being involved is a choice

for most of us.

There are others, however, that don’t get to have those choices.

How do we support them? How do we make others aware of this fact? How do we get to the top of their pile?

And not just because it’s part of being an educator but because we have the freedom to care, connect, choose, initiate –

we have privilege.

Support – what does it mean to you?

cropped-img_0180.jpg

Friday Resource Review – Pearltrees

Screenshot 2015-10-30 13.47.44

Pearltrees is an online curation service that allows the user to store and share their own items, pictures, notes, writings and also collect and share items from the web.

Pearltrees, the place to organize all your interests, has gathered more than 2,2 million contributors, over 3 million monthly active users and 70 million items. In 2012, the company launched a 1.0 version and introduced a freemium business model that already generates significant revenue. Pearltrees has been featured multiple times by Apple, Google and Mozilla. Pearltrees apps on iOS and Android are consistently rated 5 stars and have been downloaded more than 2 million times. Press Release – September 23, 2015

In it’s most recent upgrade, Pearltrees added some great features that make organizing and sharing even easier. This new feature, Smartcloud, is “a set of features that lets people import and organize everything they’ve shared on social networks and stored on the web.”

As Lamothe, CEO and co-founder of Pearltrees comments: “With Smartcloud, you recover the memory of your life on the Internet. Each year, an average web user stores or shares several hundreds of contents that are buried in the depth of timelines. Now, with Pearltrees, web users can recover them and handle them. For massive imports, Pearltrees will automatically organize the users’ contents by topics and by collections. Now, everyone can have a visual organization of all their interests in one single place.”

Smartcloud is made up of three groups of features:

  1. Imports – Everyone can now recover their social networks’ history, the files of their cloud storage services and their search results. With a few clicks, you can add in Pearltrees hundreds or thousands of photos, tweets, Facebook posts, Drive or Dropbox files… Thanks to imports, Pearltrees becomes the living memory of your life on the Internet.
  1. The auto-organization  When imported contents are massive, the “Smartcloud” algorithm comes in and sorts them by topics and by dates. This automatic organization relies on two complementary sources: the millions of contents already organized by Pearltrees users and semantic links extracted from the web at large-scale. Thanks to this innovation, everyone can benefit from the collective intelligence of Pearltrees community and web users.

3. The instinctive organization – To add the last touch to your collections, you have to personalize them and re-organize them. For that, this new version offers contextually all the features of organization and personalization (collections moving, addition, edition…), according to current needs.

I’ve been using Pearltrees for about 3 years. It has evolved over time and has become the tool I use for archiving web clips, storing photos and sharing with others. Because it seamlessly works across devices, I am able to access my content from anywhere. As I organize items for #saskedchat, upload my own photos or share items with others, Pearltrees allows me to keep all things in one place and the ability to make collections and sort these collections is made even simpler through the drag and drop features. It also makes it easy to search for items because all things are located in one place, pictures, documents, videos, all stored in one place.

Pearltrees has a great offer for educators –

You’re a teacher and you’ve always been hesitant to use Pearltrees professionally? The offer we’re launching is made for you. It includes three plans, from free to premium, that each extends your educational uses of Pearltrees from creating lessons to presenting in classroom not to mention collaborating with students.

As an educator, being able to put pictures and webpages into a presentation allows for easy organization. “The first use of Pearltrees is to show Pearltrees collections in class. The free Assistant plan, exclusively for teachers, allows content presentation with its clean, advertising-free interface. ” If you looking for ideas and ways of sharing with students, Pearltrees has a great Resource page for teachers.  I’ve created a short screencast to show some of the different features found in Pearltrees. If you have any questions or would like some assistance, don’t hesitate to contact me through the blog or @kwhobbes on twitter.

Pearltrees Demonstration

#saskedchat – September 10, 2015

Screenshot 2015-09-10 18.12.39
Our chat this week centred around School Culture. Participants reflected on the importance of positive school culture on the learning and relationships of teachers, students and parents. Participants shared ideas and resources for building and shaping a positive school culture and the important role that students and parents play in developing a school culture. Check out the archive for some great ideas and resources!

It’s about being Curious

2015-06-27 16.53.26

Ever watch a small child with something they have picked up? How they study it and become fascinated by what they are looking at? Or how they will watch insects just crawl around? If you’ve done this, then you know that it will be followed by questions. Many questions! Oh so many questions. But….. the wonder and awe…. and joy in those questions.

Rediscovering Curious

I’ve always been curious about the world. Growing up on a farm, I had so much freedom to roam, search and discover. Some of the discoveries were amazing – watching a calf being born or holding a small chick were amazing. Climbing trees to touch the sky and lying on the hill in the pasture just watching the clouds flow by …. wondering how they stayed up there. I was actually disappointed when I learned that I couldn’t ride one. Somewhere along the way, that curiosity slowly changed into wondering about how things worked – how does a motor run? Taking things apart to find out and then putting it back together to see if, indeed, it would still run led to fixing things which led to breaking things to see just how far to the edge things could be pushed. Yes, I know what the sound of a blown motor sounds like!

The wondering about changed but I was still curious. However, being curious and wanting to know why, asking questions isn’t always popular. Or desirable. I learned that asking why wasn’t necessarily a great trait in the system of education. Eventually the wonder wandered. It was gone for a while, replace by the search to fit in and move up.

I almost missed finding my wonder, almost gave up that the best that I could hope for was to mull around the edges of fitting in. I almost missed it because I was scared. As Jamie Forest explores in her post What’s holding you back? fear holds us back and gives us an excuse not to. It reminds us that being curious has consequences that might not be pleasant so we back off. It keeps us from exploring and wondering. As Jamie says about sharing our ideas:

Deep down, however, the dialogue is different.  Who would want to read it?  My ideas aren’t worth sharing.  My ideas aren’t original.  What if what I write doesn’t match what I mean?  What if I get negative, or downright mean, feedback?

Fear keeps us from wondering and then creating. It holds us back and reminds us that it’s safe. “Let others take the chance. A few might succeed but so many fail” bounce around whenever we begin to flirt with the idea of publicly sharing our wonder. We rationalize our fear – use big data to defend it – “There’s only one Great One.” We strip away the awe, wonder and curiosity in order to be safe. We forget to look at the ants in awe and wonder, instead thinking “I hope they don’t move any closer to the house. That will be a pain to get rid of them.” We see problems and roadblocks, ways that disappointment will lead to hurt and pain. “I just want a normal life” becomes something we allow to seep into our thoughts as Fear gains hold. “Be safe. You might not like your job but it’s safe. The pension is good. It’s only 8 more years.”

Safe. Secure. Without Risk. Life in a box …… let someone else take the chance.

I Danced in the Rain

This year I spent every weekday morning with my son being a stay-at-home dad and

I FOUND MY WONDER!

There it was, dancing and splashing in the puddles on a rainy day. My first urge was to stop it. To remind it that there would be wet shoes and sticky shirts and, even worse, sticky underwear!

And then I joined in. Splashing, dancing and catching raindrops on my tongue. I didn’t care if the neighbours saw us. Since then I have skipped across parking lots, rolled in leaves, stared at ants, rolled in the snow, gotten wet, cold, muddy and sweaty. I’ve played and read, coloured and drawn.

But I was still afraid to share what I was doing. Afraid because that’s not what real men do.

And then I wandered with wonder to the edge, a place I hadn’t been in a long time for Fear had told me that to fit in, being near the edge wouldn’t work. But the box of wonder had been opened and the lid wouldn’t go back on.

Being Curious is Where It Starts

This week, ISTE has been filling my twitter feed with updates and blog posts about different things. Some are the excited and exhilarating tweets of people who have found their WONDER again. Mostly, they tweet about tools and different ways that this or that technology has them wondering. They are curious. They want to know more.  Some are disappointed by the lack of a shift away from the tech and tools. I get that – I’m not often wowed any more by a tool. And it is important to remember that learning is about relationships – helping others to seek and learn, to fan the flame of curiosity, awe and wonder despite the adult desire to calculate, allocate and fixate on data. Tools can enhance the learning in many, many ways.

I Wonder

Seeing adults excited and rekindling their wonder is a start. Excited about Genius Hour, Maker Space, Flipped Classrooms, Problem Based Learning, Justice Education, Emotional Intelligence, etc – moving past their fear to wonder and explore. That’s good. It’s changes the story we are telling, which changes the language we use to discuss learning, which allows for a different story to begin to filter to others…..

Being curious is where it starts.

Helping spark that curiosity is a gift of sharing wonder. No, not all teachers are joining in the discussion. But it’s more than it was – and that’s good!

Join Us

Jana Scott Lindsay’s post Thinking Beyond the Box explores some of the reasons why teachers don’t blog and share.

These are only some of the questions that would most likely surface:
What would I say?
Who would read what I wrote anyway?
How will I react to negative feedback?
What if no one reads what I wrote?
Why would I want to share my thinking with others?
 
In reality, these are very natural feelings.  Ones that seem to plague us as a society, no matter what age or category we fall into. Fear and insecurity have been known to drive us not only towards that box, but force us to exist entirely within it for most of our lives. Feeling safe is sometimes more than a fallback, it becomes a necessity.
However, she invites readers, as I do, to join us as we get out of the box.
Please join us as we take on a new adventure- follow along here at #skblog15
Today might be the day that begins a journey that you will look back on years from now and wonder why it took so long. Unless you are willing to go beyond the box, you just might never know.
She’s right. Although Fear might be whispering at you to take it safe, we offer that rediscovering your wonder and awe is worth it. Please, join us.
Dance in the rain.
                               Watch ants or that butterfly or the clouds float by.
Experience your Wonder and Awe!

No More Box

I will not be confined by the box of Fear

Nor the worry that others will not understand

That some will push back while others ignore

Will no longer stop my Wonder and Awe.

No Box will inhibit my search at the edge

Nor will Fear keep me back from moving along

Looking and dancing and skipping and seeing

It’s time to Bust Open the Box that disabled

Wonder and Awe are back on the table.